Two Nigerians among 15 emerging young African entrepreneurs

African

Fifteen young African entrepreneurs have emerged as finalists from a field of more than 800 applicants for the seventh annual Anzisha Prize, Africa’s premier award for her youngest entrepreneurs.

Supported by African Leadership Academy (ALA) in partnership with the Mastercard Foundation, the Anzisha Prize celebrates and cultivates the next generation of young African entrepreneurial leaders who are creating job opportunities, solving local development problems and driving economies.

Selected from 14 countries, nearly half of all candidates are young women representing sectors as diverse as clean energy, agriculture, waste recycling and youth empowerment. For the first time, candidates from Angola, Liberia, Mauritius, and Sudan entered the competition.

“We are excited by the number of young women finalists and thrilled that the prize is contributing to their economic empowerment,” Anzisha Prize Associate Melissa Mbazo said. “The success of these women-led businesses will be accelerated by access to Anzisha’s financial and mentorship support.”

Among these young innovators is 15-year-old Nigerian Victoria Olimatunde, the founder of Bizkidz, a board game designed to teach children about financial literacy and the rudimentary aspects of starting a small scale business through a fun and interactive manner.

She will be joined by her fellow countryman, Ajiroghene Omanudhowo. Ajiro founded 360 Needs which is a social enterprise that was created to identify & solve logistical problems in his community. Both entrepreneurs’ businesses are impactful and transformative.

Other entrepreneurs include Liberian Satta Wahab, founder of Naz Naturals, a cosmetics company that creates organic hair care products that empower young girls and women to feel beautiful and confident with their natural hair and Thowiba Alhaj, the founder of Work Jump-Up Sudan, an organisation empowering university students by linking them to job opportunities.

“The calibre and diversity of the young men and women competing for this year’s Anzisha Prize is impressive and improves each year,” said Koffi Assouan, Program Manager, Youth Livelihoods at the Mastercard Foundation.

“As the pool of Anzisha fellows continues to grow, so too does their impact and influence on local communities and economies.”

Azubike Nnadozie, with Agency report

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