Ethiopia: “We don’t need aid, we need investments”

Ethiopia: “We don’t need aid, we need investments”

Meles MebrahtuINDUSTRIAL MINISTER

What is industry’s share in Ethiopia’s economy?
About 15% of GDP, against 39% for agriculture and 46% for services. Industry is experiencing strong growth, in the region of 8.8% in 2015, but only employs 5% to 7% of a substantial labor force. Indeed, 80% of our 49 million active workers rely on agriculture.

Our aim is to increase industry’s share to 25% of GDP by 2025. The contribution made by factories currently stands at 5% of GDP, a share we want to bring to 15% in ten years. We are focusing on light manufacturing in order to process our raw materials from agriculture and livestock. Cereals, coffee, seeds, cotton, sugar cane, vegetables, cut flowers and livestock account for the bulk of our exports.

We are conducting a pilot program with UNIDO to build agri-food industrial parks in order to attract investments and continue our economic transformation, which has been massive over the last twelve years and has focused on light manufacturing.

Our objective is to become a middle-income country. We also wish to modernize our agriculture in order to move towards a commercial primary sector, with the potential to increase the farmers’ income.

Did you conduct prospective studies in order to prepare your industrialization policy?

Our long-term programs run until 2025. Our second growth and transformation plan, which was launched in 2015, gives priority to industry and urban development.

Many studies have been conducted, which convinced us to conduct a policy with a real impact. Ethiopia has become a pilot country at international level. We carry a double responsibility, towards our people and other African countries. Development is possible, even for a nation like ours, without substantial mineral resources.

Isn’t processing agricultural raw materials the key to all development, which African countries have known for decades?
The African population as a whole relies on agriculture for their livelihood. Africa exports considerable volumes of unprocessed raw materials, cocoa, coffee, etc. Agriculture is exposed to climate conditions and fluctuations in commodity prices on world markets. Our duty is to provide added value in order to reduce our populations’ vulnerability.

We need to invest on the basis of a clear program, with a vision, and attract investments in a well-prepared manner. Without a vision, we won’t be able to go through the successive stages of development. Africa no longer has a choice. We need to specialize in certain global value chains and think about selling in Africa’s regional trade, which is still underdeveloped. Inter-African trade accounts for about only 10% of foreign trade in Africa.

Are you willing to attract investors at all costs, with the risk of selling off your assets, such as arable land?
The private sector has a key role to play. Whether national or foreign, all types of investors have their strengths and weaknesses. In the short term, Ethiopian companies do not have the technology or know-how to conquer international markets. They must consequently learn as a first step. It should be noted that certain sectors of our economy are reserved for nationals: banking, insurance, telecommunications and microfinance. The other sectors are open to foreign direct investment (FDI), which is experiencing strong growth – 24% a year on average.

No country can develop without FDI, within a clear regulatory framework which allows the invested capital to be protected and profits to be repatriated. Major groups are present, Castel and Heineken in the brewery sector, Turkish companies in the textile industry, others in energy, as well as 130 major companies in horticulture.

Controversies have erupted over land grabbing by foreign actors. What exactly is the situation?
This is a false problem! Land is a public good in Ethiopia and can be subject to concessions for clearly defined durations. It is set out in our Constitution. No one confiscates land in our country. However, due to political considerations or for other interests, members of the opposition, as well as NGOs, criticize these contracts as being land grabbing, whereas the State maintains its control.

Is Ethiopia, a landlocked country, dependent on the economic dynamism of its neighbors?
We have our own policies which allow us to achieve sustained growth in a difficult region, the Horn of Africa. We are a stable country with a highly determined Government, which organizes transparent electoral processes, with zero tolerance for corruption.

All this has allowed us to develop our economy over the past ten years. We invest in railways, education, health and agriculture. Poverty reduction programs account for 70 % of our expenditure. Our social objectives are sometimes more ambitious than the SDGs. All this has fostered interest by the private sector and international community.

A final point is that we do not consider ourselves as a landlocked, but a landlinked country. A railway line links Ethiopia to the port of Djibouti, and land corridors are being developed towards Port Sudan and Mombasa in Kenya.

In a troubled region, is Ethiopia an isolated case?
No, we belong to regional blocs and we are concerned with resolving our neighbors’ conflicts. Moreover, we have contingents in AMISOM, the pan-African peacekeeping mission in Somalia. We position ourselves as a model with regard to our neighbors in order to address the tribal issue.

Does development require a strong State?
It is based on three main pillars. The first: its inclusive and sustainable nature, firmly rooted in the field. The second: democratization, the capacity for a government to be accountable and serve a population. The third: good governance, which is essential for investment, and unfortunately continues to be a major problem in many African countries. In Ethiopia, we are conducting a zero tolerance policy with regard to corruption at every level, even ministerial. Drastic measures have been taken and senior officials have been brought to justice.

Are you still experiencing some negative perceptions of Africa?

These perceptions do indeed persist, particularly about Ethiopia, which was severely affected by famine in the 1980s. It will take time to overcome this image, but we have already started to change it.

The perceptions that Africans may have of their partners are increasingly going to matter too… Many African countries are skeptical towards Europe, which absorbs our raw materials without investing in processing them on the spot. We need to develop a “win-win” partnership.

We too are faced with the global challenges of migration and terrorism. We are not looking for aid, but investments! Giving young people employment in our countries is a matter of urgency. These generations emigrate because they have no economic or political prospects. We need to work together to achieve Africa’s potential.

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‫”ميرال” تزيح الستار عن الهوية الجديدة لجزيرة ياس

ترسم الهوية الجديدة ملامح مستقبل جزيرة ياس المشرق أعلن الزعابي عن خطة جزيرة ياس 2022 “ميرال” تطلق حملة #أحلامك_في_جزيرة_ياس التي تدعو زوار الجزيرة إلى مشاركة أجمل اللحظات والأمنيات التي حققوها أو يتطلعون إلى تحقيقها في جزيرة ياس جزيرة ياس، أبوظبي – 27 سبتمبر 2016: أزاحت شركة “ميرال” خلال حفل كبير أقيم في عالم فيراري أبوظبي، […]

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Presidential Determination — Foreign Governments' Efforts Regarding Trafficking in Persons

MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY OF STATE

SUBJECT:        Presidential Determination on Foreign
                         Governments’ Efforts Regarding Trafficking in
                         Persons

Consistent with section 110 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (the “Act”) (22 U.S.C. 7107), I hereby:

Make the determination provided in section 110(d)(1)(A)(i) of the Act, with respect to Equatorial Guinea, Iran, South Sudan, Sudan, Venezuela, and Zimbabwe not to provide certain non-humanitarian, non-trade-related assistance for those countries’ governments for Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, until such governments comply with the minimum standards or make significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance, as may be determined by the Secretary of State in a report to the Congress pursuant to section 110(b) of the Act;

Make the determination provided in section 110(d)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act, with respect to Eritrea, North Korea, Russia, and Syria not to provide non-humanitarian, non-trade-related assistance or to allow funding for participation by officials or employees of those countries’ governments in educational and cultural exchange programs for FY 2017, until such governments comply with the minimum standards or make significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance, as may be determined by the Secretary of State in a report to the Congress pursuant to section 110(b) of the Act;

Make the determination provided in section 110(d)(1)(B) of the Act to instruct the United States Executive Director of each multilateral development bank and of the International Monetary Fund to vote against and use best efforts to deny any loan or other utilization of the funds of the respective institution (other than for humanitarian assistance, for trade-related assistance, or for development assistance that directly addresses basic human needs, is not administered by the government of such country, and confers no benefit to that government) to Eritrea, Iran, North Korea, Russia, and Zimbabwe for FY 2017, until such governments comply with the minimum standards or makes significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Algeria, Belarus, Belize, Burma, Burundi, the Central African Republic, Comoros, Djibouti, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Papua New Guinea, Suriname, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan that provision to these countries’ governments of all programs, projects, or activities described in sections 110(d)(1)(A) and 110(d)(1)(B) of the Act would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Equatorial Guinea, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, and Venezuela, that assistance described in section 110(d)(1)(B) of the Act would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Eritrea, Russia, and Syria, that a partial waiver to allow funding for educational and cultural exchange programs described in section 110(d)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Equatorial Guinea, that a partial waiver to allow assistance described in section 110(d)(1)(A)(i) of the Act to promote sustainable natural resource management and biodiversity and programs to advance energy access; and support the participation of government employees or officials in young leader exchanges and leadership programs would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to South Sudan, that a partial waiver to allow assistance and programs described in section 110(d)(1)(A)(i) of the Act, with the exception of Foreign Military Financing, Foreign Military Sales, and Excess Defense Articles, would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to South Sudan, that a waiver to allow assistance to be provided pursuant to section 1208 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66), to the extent that such programs would otherwise be restricted by the Act, would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Sudan, that a partial waiver to allow assistance and programs described in section 110(d)(1)(A)(i) of the Act, with the exception of Foreign Military Financing, Foreign Military Sales, International Military Education and Training, Peacekeeping Operations, and Excess Defense Articles, would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Venezuela, that a partial waiver to allow for assistance described in section 110(d)(1)(A)(i) of the Act to strengthen the democratic process in Venezuela and for participation by government officials and employees in foreign assistance-funded programs related to democracy and rule of law would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

Determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Zimbabwe, that a partial waiver to allow for assistance described in section 110(d)(1)(A)(i) of the Act to support programs that provide assistance for victims of trafficking in persons, promote biodiversity and wildlife protection, health, good governance, education, leadership, agriculture and food security, poverty reduction, livelihoods, family planning and reproductive health, macroeconomic growth, that would have a significant adverse effect on vulnerable populations if suspended, and allow for the participation of government employees or officials in young leader exchanges and leadership programs, would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States;

And determine, consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, with respect to Zimbabwe, that assistance described in section 110(d)(1)(B) of the Act, which:

(1) is a regional program, project, or activity under which the total benefit to Zimbabwe does not exceed 10 percent of the total value of such program, project, or activity;

(2) has as its primary objective the addressing of basic human needs, as defined by the Department of the Treasury with respect to other, existing legislative mandates concerning U.S. partici

(3) is complementary to or has similar policy objectives to programs being implemented bilaterally by the United States Government;

(4) has as its primary objective the improvement of Zimbabwe’s legal system, including in areas that impact Zimbabwe’s ability to investigate and prosecute trafficking cases or otherwise improve implementation of its anti-trafficking policy, regulations, or legislation;

(5) is engaging a government, international organization, or civil society organization, and seeks as its primary objective(s) to: (a) increase efforts to investigate and prosecute trafficking in persons crimes; (b) increase protection for victims of trafficking through better screening, identification, rescue/removal, aftercare (shelter, counseling), training, and reintegration; or (c) expand prevention efforts through education and awareness campaigns highlighting the dangers of trafficking in persons or training and economic empowerment of populations clearly at risk of falling victim to trafficking; or

(6) is targeted macroeconomic assistance from the International Monetary Fund that strengthens the macroeconomic management capacity of Zimbabwe; would promote the purposes of the Act; or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States.

The certification required by section 110(e) of the Act is provided herewith.

You are hereby authorized and directed to submit this determination to the Congress, and to publish it in the Federal Register.

BARACK OBAMA

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Soudan élu vice-président de la 60éme conférence de l'AIEA

Khartoum, 27 Sept. 2016 (SUNA)- Le Ministre des Ressources hydrauliques et de l’Irrigation, de l’Electricité, Motaz Musa Abdullah dirige la délégation du Soudan participant aux réunions de la soixantième session de l’Agence Internationale de l’Energie Atomique (AIEA), qui se tiendra dans la capitale autrichienne Vienne du 26 au 30 du mois courant.

Le Ministre a présenté la déclaration du Soudan à la conférence, soulignant le souci du Soudan à la coopération permanente avec l’agence depuis son adhésion en 1958en renouvelant l’accueil du Soudan au soutien fournit par l’agence pour le projet d’éliminer et d’éradiquer le paludisme par les radiations nucléaires.

Le Ministre a souligné la volonté du Soudan pour développer la production nucléaire pour répondre aux besoins croissants de l’économie de l’énergie électrique, en particulier que la production d’énergie nucléaire fournit une énergie propre et pas cher

Il convient de noter que le Soudan a été élu Vice-président de la soixante Conférence de l’Agence Internationale de l’Energie Atomique, un représentant de l’Afrique.
Fin
Abeer

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Middle East Distribution Transformer Market worth $3.9 billion by 2024

Middle East Distribution Transformer Market size was over USD 2.75 billion in 2015, and is anticipated to grow at 3.9% CAGR from 2016 to 2024.

PR-Inside.com: 2016-09-27 11:27:11

Middle East Distribution Transformer Market size is estimated to reach USD 3.92 billion by 2024; according to a new research report by Global Market Insights, Inc.

Distribution transformers are primarily used to distribute power in a particular locality, industrial estates as well as remotely located houses and buildings and are usually found on the pole or underground near residential, commercial, or industrial areas. Rising population across the region may further instigate need to save energy, which in turn is expected to catalyze distribution transformer market growth over the forecast timeframe. Growing knowledge pertaining to sustainable development among the general population may further increase demand for energy efficient solutions. These devices represent to be one of the major sources of power loss and are easily measurable and replaceable. Thus, implementation of these innovative systems may aid in power loss reduction.

Request for a sample of this research report @ www.gminsights.com/request-sample/detail/686

Energy use in households and commercial buildings accounts for major part of the total energy consumption. Two major sources of energy consumption which can be regulated are interior environment comfort and electrical appliances. Several countries in the Middle East including Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and UAE have developed policies to limit the consumption. These policies may spur government initiatives for using efficient devices on power transmission poles across the region in order to further decrease energy consumption at higher level.

Technological development across the electrical equipment sector is expected to be a key factor contributing towards the Middle East distribution transformer market size. Growing trend towards the use of thinner material for outer metallic coating may further reduce losses. Introduction of nanotechnology is anticipated to improve several parameters. For instance, integration of hydrogen sensors with wireless transmission can help monitor device status remotely and take corrective measures efficiently. Smart distribution transformer is also expected to be used in electrical vehicle charging, as it encompasses AC Level 2 charging that can overload distribution network at distant buses.

Key insights from the report include:

• Small distribution transformer market share will witness growth with 3.9% CAGR from 2016 to 2024. Increased adoption of these devices across indoor and outdoor applications is expected to catalyze growth.

• Liquid filled distribution transformer market size was valued at over USD 2 billion in 2015; it is likely to grow at an estimated 4% CAGR. Features such as compactness and substantial cost optimization may catalyze the product demand through 2024. Dry type segment is likely to witness considerable growth prospects, over the next seven years. Surging demand for these devices from fire safety application such as marine, underground substations, mining sites, and associated industrial activities may fuel revenue.

• Saudi Arabia distribution transformer market share is forecast to lead the industry, with revenue set to surpass USD 1.5 billion by 2024. Significant energy consumption in the residential and commercial sectors alike will drive regional growth.

• Key industry participants include General Electric, ABB Group, Abaft, Alfanar, Intact and Bawan. Other players in the industry are Saudi Federal Transformers, Matelec, Tesar, SGB-SMIT, and Siemens.

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